Coronavirus COVID-19

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by UNI88 »

SunCoastBlueHen wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 10:30 am
Florida has announced plans to have kids return to school as usual in less than a month from today. Teachers (including my wife) are losing their minds over this. No additional funding for things like hand sanitizer and extra masks has been offered to help protect the classrooms. No real contingency plans either regarding what happens if students and teachers start getting sick. It's gonna be a shit show.

As a side note, Florida reported a record number of deaths (132) today.
Schools know and take it for granted that teachers will spend their own money on classroom supplies.

The kids are young and are unlikely to have a problem argument ignores the reality that they're carriers who will pick up the virus at school and take it home to their parents, grandparents, etc. not to mention the teachers and administrators getting it and taking it home as well. The problem isn't just that students will be exposed, it's that they will spread it to others.

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by SeattleGriz »

UNI88 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 10:46 am
SunCoastBlueHen wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 10:30 am
Florida has announced plans to have kids return to school as usual in less than a month from today. Teachers (including my wife) are losing their minds over this. No additional funding for things like hand sanitizer and extra masks has been offered to help protect the classrooms. No real contingency plans either regarding what happens if students and teachers start getting sick. It's gonna be a shit show.

As a side note, Florida reported a record number of deaths (132) today.
Schools know and take it for granted that teachers will spend their own money on classroom supplies.

The kids are young and are unlikely to have a problem argument ignores the reality that they're carriers who will pick up the virus at school and take it home to their parents, grandparents, etc. not to mention the teachers and administrators getting it and taking it home as well. The problem isn't just that students will be exposed, it's that they will spread it to others.
Sounds like what my wife and I lived through with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. We took precautions and protected ourselves. Others can do that.

I guess the question is, where do you draw the line?
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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by UNI88 »

SeattleGriz wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 11:07 am
UNI88 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 10:46 am

Schools know and take it for granted that teachers will spend their own money on classroom supplies.

The kids are young and are unlikely to have a problem argument ignores the reality that they're carriers who will pick up the virus at school and take it home to their parents, grandparents, etc. not to mention the teachers and administrators getting it and taking it home as well. The problem isn't just that students will be exposed, it's that they will spread it to others.
Sounds like what my wife and I lived through with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. We took precautions and protected ourselves. Others can do that.

I guess the question is, where do you draw the line?
Some good questions copied from a Facebook post:
Mr. President?

Questions for School Openings:

• If a teacher tests positive for COVID-19 are they required to quarantine for 2-3 weeks? Is their sick leave covered, paid?

• If that teacher has 5 classes a day with 30 students each, do all 150 of those students need to then stay home and quarantine for 14 days?

• Do all 150 of those students now have to get tested? Who pays for those tests? Are they happening at school? How are the parents being notified? Does everyone in each of those kids' families need to get tested? Who pays for that?

• What if someone who lives in the same house as a teacher tests positive? Does that teacher now need to take 14 days off of work to quarantine? Is that time off covered? Paid?

• Where is the district going to find a substitute teacher who will work in a classroom full of exposed, possibly infected students for substitute pay?

• Substitutes teach in multiple schools. What if they are diagnosed with COVID-19? Do all the kids in each school now have to quarantine and get tested? Who is going to pay for that?

• What if a student in your kid's class tests positive? What if your kid tests positive? Does every other student and teacher they have been around quarantine? Do we all get notified who is infected and when? Or because of HIPAA regulations are parents and teachers just going to get mysterious “may have been in contact” emails all year long?

• What is this stress going to do to our teachers? How does it affect their health and well-being? How does it affect their ability to teach? How does it affect the quality of education they are able to provide? What is it going to do to our kids? What are the long-term effects of consistently being stressed out?

• How will it affect students and faculty when the first teacher in their school dies from this? The first parent of a student who brought it home? The first kid?

• How many more people are going to die, that otherwise would not have if we had stayed home longer?

30% of the teachers in the US are over 50. About 16% of the total deaths in the US are people between the ages of 45-65.

We are choosing to put our teachers in danger.

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by SDHornet »

kalm wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 10:14 am
SDHornet wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 9:38 am
Great news! So it’s only going to kill 328,000 and hospitalize and cause permanent health problems to millions more!

Let’s open up!
Show your math. :coffee:

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by SDHornet »

kalm wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 10:12 am
SDHornet wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 8:51 am

:dunce:
Oooh! I get privileged with the dunce emoji? :clap:

Thanks BDKCSUS!
For stupid posts, you get a stupid reply...so yeah exactly in the BDKKK vein. :lol: :thumb:

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by SDHornet »

UNI88 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 10:46 am
SunCoastBlueHen wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 10:30 am
Florida has announced plans to have kids return to school as usual in less than a month from today. Teachers (including my wife) are losing their minds over this. No additional funding for things like hand sanitizer and extra masks has been offered to help protect the classrooms. No real contingency plans either regarding what happens if students and teachers start getting sick. It's gonna be a shit show.

As a side note, Florida reported a record number of deaths (132) today.
Schools know and take it for granted that teachers will spend their own money on classroom supplies.

The kids are young and are unlikely to have a problem argument ignores the reality that they're carriers who will pick up the virus at school and take it home to their parents, grandparents, etc. not to mention the teachers and administrators getting it and taking it home as well. The problem isn't just that students will be exposed, it's that they will spread it to others.
This is a valid point and precautions should be taken to mitigate that risk...

...however that argument can be used for any industry deemed "essential" that has been open this whole time. Grocers, cashiers, etc have been engaging with hundreds of people everyday.

And I'm fine with schools not reopening, but there should be a furlough to all educational employees to account for the difference between "in person" learning and "distance' learning.

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by kalm »

SDHornet wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:19 pm
kalm wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 10:12 am


Oooh! I get privileged with the dunce emoji? :clap:

Thanks BDKCSUS!
For stupid posts, you get a stupid reply...so yeah exactly in the BDKKK vein. :lol: :thumb:
Unless my state has a miraculous turn around shortly, we’ll be heading back to lock downs again soon...just like March...and California now. This potentially shuts down my business and friends businesses around me. Regardless of your feels. :coffee:
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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by kalm »

SDHornet wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:19 pm
kalm wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 10:14 am


Great news! So it’s only going to kill 328,000 and hospitalize and cause permanent health problems to millions more!

Let’s open up!
Show your math. :coffee:
.01% x 328 million. Average hospital stay of a month. Permanent organ damage already detected in survivors. The numbers for the latter two are TBD.
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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by BDKJMU »

Gil Dobie wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 2:50 pm
BDKJMU wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 2:07 pm

No, but there's no reason for alarm in a state of around 21 million, loaded with Q-tips, that have death numbers as low as Florida's..
Average age of Florida residents is 42.2, not much above the National Average. Many of the Q-Tips as you call them list Florida as their residents, because there is no state income tax and live back north during the hot and humid Florida summers.
Florida's 42.2 is 4 years above the nat avg of 38.2 according to wiki. That's pretty significant.

Anyway, I assumed FL would be #1. I see they are #5. Maine, NH, Vermont #1/#2/#3. Wonder why so many old folks upper New England? Utah dead last (among states) at 31.0 yrs old. Those procreating Mormons.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U ... median_age

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by Gil Dobie »

BDKJMU wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:33 pm
Gil Dobie wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 2:50 pm


Average age of Florida residents is 42.2, not much above the National Average. Many of the Q-Tips as you call them list Florida as their residents, because there is no state income tax and live back north during the hot and humid Florida summers.
Florida's 42.2 is 4 years above the nat avg of 38.2 according to wiki. That's pretty significant.

Anyway, I assumed FL would be #1. I see they are #5. Maine, NH, Vermont #1/#2/#3. Wonder why so many old folks upper New England? Utah dead last (among states) at 31.0 yrs old. Those procreating Mormons.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U ... median_age
132 new deaths in Florida today. :ohno:
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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by UNI88 »

SDHornet wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:23 pm
UNI88 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 10:46 am

Schools know and take it for granted that teachers will spend their own money on classroom supplies.

The kids are young and are unlikely to have a problem argument ignores the reality that they're carriers who will pick up the virus at school and take it home to their parents, grandparents, etc. not to mention the teachers and administrators getting it and taking it home as well. The problem isn't just that students will be exposed, it's that they will spread it to others.
This is a valid point and precautions should be taken to mitigate that risk...

...however that argument can be used for any industry deemed "essential" that has been open this whole time. Grocers, cashiers, etc have been engaging with hundreds of people everyday.

And I'm fine with schools not reopening, but there should be a furlough to all educational employees to account for the difference between "in person" learning and "distance' learning.
There is a difference in exposure - grocers, cashiers, etc. are exposed to a number of people for brief periods of time. Many stores also put up plexiglass shields between the cashier and the customer. A classroom would have an average of 20-30 people in a confined space for a longer period of time. I'm not sure if plexiglass could be used. Could the school require students with health conditions that prevented them from wearing a mask to homeschool? I'm not an expert and don't know if the risks of exposure/spread are comparable.

Ideally there would be some in-person instruction because I don't think education was quite the same being solely online but I'm guessing they don't reopen. Online education should require a significant enough effort from teachers so that they should be paid. Office staff, janitorial, food service, etc. would not be needed to the same degree and many could be furloughed. Principals and other administrators should randomly audit classes to make sure that teachers are doing more than just giving it out assignments (i.e. lectures, group projects, online quizzes, etc.).

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by SDHornet »

kalm wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:33 pm
SDHornet wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:19 pm


Show your math. :coffee:
.01% x 328 million. Average hospital stay of a month. Permanent organ damage already detected in survivors. The numbers for the latter two are TBD.
What about those impacted by job loss?

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by SDHornet »

UNI88 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 2:38 pm
SDHornet wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:23 pm


This is a valid point and precautions should be taken to mitigate that risk...

...however that argument can be used for any industry deemed "essential" that has been open this whole time. Grocers, cashiers, etc have been engaging with hundreds of people everyday.

And I'm fine with schools not reopening, but there should be a furlough to all educational employees to account for the difference between "in person" learning and "distance' learning.
There is a difference in exposure - grocers, cashiers, etc. are exposed to a number of people for brief periods of time. Many stores also put up plexiglass shields between the cashier and the customer. A classroom would have an average of 20-30 people in a confined space for a longer period of time. I'm not sure if plexiglass could be used. Could the school require students with health conditions that prevented them from wearing a mask to homeschool? I'm not an expert and don't know if the risks of exposure/spread are comparable.

Ideally there would be some in-person instruction because I don't think education was quite the same being solely online but I'm guessing they don't reopen. Online education should require a significant enough effort from teachers so that they should be paid. Office staff, janitorial, food service, etc. would not be needed to the same degree and many could be furloughed. Principals and other administrators should randomly audit classes to make sure that teachers are doing more than just giving it out assignments (i.e. lectures, group projects, online quizzes, etc.).
Agree. Not sure how on-line instruction will be audited, and more importantly, if the teachers unions (guess who!!!) will allow such auditing.

I'm not sure I buy the idea of on-line instruction requiring the same time and effort as in-person. I know a HS level teacher who just had to have "on-line office hours" (whatever the fuck that means) and distribute homework. It probably depends on age/class level. So I stand by my "furlough teachers accordingly" stance.

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by kalm »

SDHornet wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:14 pm
kalm wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:33 pm


.01% x 328 million. Average hospital stay of a month. Permanent organ damage already detected in survivors. The numbers for the latter two are TBD.
What about those impacted by job loss?
That’s the question. Job losses occur whether you re-open fully or phase it in. History and current economics shows getting the spread down to manageable levels causes less economic damage in the long run.
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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by UNI88 »

SDHornet wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:19 pm
UNI88 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 2:38 pm


There is a difference in exposure - grocers, cashiers, etc. are exposed to a number of people for brief periods of time. Many stores also put up plexiglass shields between the cashier and the customer. A classroom would have an average of 20-30 people in a confined space for a longer period of time. I'm not sure if plexiglass could be used. Could the school require students with health conditions that prevented them from wearing a mask to homeschool? I'm not an expert and don't know if the risks of exposure/spread are comparable.

Ideally there would be some in-person instruction because I don't think education was quite the same being solely online but I'm guessing they don't reopen. Online education should require a significant enough effort from teachers so that they should be paid. Office staff, janitorial, food service, etc. would not be needed to the same degree and many could be furloughed. Principals and other administrators should randomly audit classes to make sure that teachers are doing more than just giving it out assignments (i.e. lectures, group projects, online quizzes, etc.).
Agree. Not sure how on-line instruction will be audited, and more importantly, if the teachers unions (guess who!!!) will allow such auditing.

I'm not sure I buy the idea of on-line instruction requiring the same time and effort as in-person. I know a HS level teacher who just had to have "on-line office hours" (whatever the fuck that means) and distribute homework. It probably depends on age/class level. So I stand by my "furlough teachers accordingly" stance.
Just having "on-line office hours" and distributing homework is what I meant by just giving out assignments. A teacher who does that is taking advantage of the situation and isn't really teaching. Depending on grade level and subject, I would expect teachers to hold live online classes (using Zoom or whatever technology the district provides) this should include in-class breakouts, outside of class virtual areas for group projects, and interactive quizzes (using Kahoot or similar). Online learning is repetitive and boring if all the students are doing is reading assignments and taking written tests/quizzes. There are a lot of tools that can help make online learning more fun and interactive that will help students learn and retain better. Districts should be helping teachers by providing platform access and training on these tools. Last semester was a shock and districts, schools and teachers were caught with their pants down. They've had the entire summer to get ready for this fall and don't have any excuses.

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by Gil Dobie »

Spreading to the elderly in Florida now. Yikes.
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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by Ivytalk »

Gil Dobie wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 6:50 pm
Spreading to the elderly in Florida now. Yikes.
And this is a surprise because why?

Honestly, Gil, you seem to enjoy posting morbid stuff about deaths. To what end? I think I’ll start calling you J. Eeyore Dobie, Esq.
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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by kalm »

Ivytalk wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 7:11 pm
Gil Dobie wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 6:50 pm
Spreading to the elderly in Florida now. Yikes.
And this is a surprise because why?

Honestly, Gil, you seem to enjoy posting morbid stuff about deaths. To what end? I think I’ll start calling you J. Eeyore Dobie, Esq.
It’s not a surprise. Just sad because other countries and locations have shown its avoidable.
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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by Gil Dobie »

Ivytalk wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 7:11 pm
Gil Dobie wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 6:50 pm
Spreading to the elderly in Florida now. Yikes.
And this is a surprise because why?

Honestly, Gil, you seem to enjoy posting morbid stuff about deaths. To what end? I think I’ll start calling you J. Eeyore Dobie, Esq.
The post was aimed at a certain poster that thinks it's not a big concern whats going on in Florida.
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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by Silenoz »

Gil Dobie wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 8:00 pm
Ivytalk wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 7:11 pm


And this is a surprise because why?

Honestly, Gil, you seem to enjoy posting morbid stuff about deaths. To what end? I think I’ll start calling you J. Eeyore Dobie, Esq.
The post was aimed at a certain poster that thinks it's not a big concern whats going on in Florida.
Do you honestly think there is anything you could possibly do to get him to concede his position even one tiny iota? Because I'm pretty sure no one on this board has ever lost ground (in their mind) in any debate about anything ever. It's really kinda amazing. The human condition at its finest.

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by Gil Dobie »

Silenoz wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 9:06 pm
Gil Dobie wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 8:00 pm


The post was aimed at a certain poster that thinks it's not a big concern whats going on in Florida.
Do you honestly think there is anything you could possibly do to get him to concede his position even one tiny iota? Because I'm pretty sure no one on this board has ever lost ground (in their mind) in any debate about anything ever. It's really kinda amazing. The human condition at its finest.
I'm doubt it changes anyone's mind. Just adds to my mythical point total.
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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by HI54UNI »

UNI88 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:41 pm
SDHornet wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:19 pm


Agree. Not sure how on-line instruction will be audited, and more importantly, if the teachers unions (guess who!!!) will allow such auditing.

I'm not sure I buy the idea of on-line instruction requiring the same time and effort as in-person. I know a HS level teacher who just had to have "on-line office hours" (whatever the fuck that means) and distribute homework. It probably depends on age/class level. So I stand by my "furlough teachers accordingly" stance.
Just having "on-line office hours" and distributing homework is what I meant by just giving out assignments. A teacher who does that is taking advantage of the situation and isn't really teaching. Depending on grade level and subject, I would expect teachers to hold live online classes (using Zoom or whatever technology the district provides) this should include in-class breakouts, outside of class virtual areas for group projects, and interactive quizzes (using Kahoot or similar). Online learning is repetitive and boring if all the students are doing is reading assignments and taking written tests/quizzes. There are a lot of tools that can help make online learning more fun and interactive that will help students learn and retain better. Districts should be helping teachers by providing platform access and training on these tools. Last semester was a shock and districts, schools and teachers were caught with their pants down. They've had the entire summer to get ready for this fall and don't have any excuses.
The return to school fight is starting to brew. The questions you posed earlier have some valid points but it is straight from the teacher's union. Parents are genuinely concerned about how they are going to keep their jobs, educate their kids, and manage childcare issues if their kids aren't in school. Some people are able to work from home but a lot cannot. The ones that cannot are really stressed. I don't get many phone calls from people but I'm starting to get them about going back to school. Our teachers are starting to make noise about not wanting to come back "for their health". We've told teachers they are coming back no matter what and they aren't happy. Even if the kids can't be in the classroom the teachers are going to be there to do their online instruction. No working from home. Pretty easy to social distance at work when every teacher has their own classroom. Also starting to hear members of the public complaining about paying taxes for full teacher salaries if the teachers aren't teaching. How do you defend that to a person that works at a grocery store or a nursing home and has a higher risk of exposure. Or a small business owner that has been shutdown for part of the year?

Yesterday I was talking to our school supt. and he said the state depart of ed and state public health had a zoom meeting for supts. about return to learn this fall. He noted that EVERY person on the call from the state was working from home. Are they keeping in mind the people that can't work from home when they make these decisions? We both have our doubts.
All my posts are satire.

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by kalm »

HI54UNI wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 5:44 am
UNI88 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:41 pm


Just having "on-line office hours" and distributing homework is what I meant by just giving out assignments. A teacher who does that is taking advantage of the situation and isn't really teaching. Depending on grade level and subject, I would expect teachers to hold live online classes (using Zoom or whatever technology the district provides) this should include in-class breakouts, outside of class virtual areas for group projects, and interactive quizzes (using Kahoot or similar). Online learning is repetitive and boring if all the students are doing is reading assignments and taking written tests/quizzes. There are a lot of tools that can help make online learning more fun and interactive that will help students learn and retain better. Districts should be helping teachers by providing platform access and training on these tools. Last semester was a shock and districts, schools and teachers were caught with their pants down. They've had the entire summer to get ready for this fall and don't have any excuses.
The return to school fight is starting to brew. The questions you posed earlier have some valid points but it is straight from the teacher's union. Parents are genuinely concerned about how they are going to keep their jobs, educate their kids, and manage childcare issues if their kids aren't in school. Some people are able to work from home but a lot cannot. The ones that cannot are really stressed. I don't get many phone calls from people but I'm starting to get them about going back to school. Our teachers are starting to make noise about not wanting to come back "for their health". We've told teachers they are coming back no matter what and they aren't happy. Even if the kids can't be in the classroom the teachers are going to be there to do their online instruction. No working from home. Pretty easy to social distance at work when every teacher has their own classroom. Also starting to hear members of the public complaining about paying taxes for full teacher salaries if the teachers aren't teaching. How do you defend that to a person that works at a grocery store or a nursing home and has a higher risk of exposure. Or a small business owner that has been shutdown for part of the year?

Yesterday I was talking to our school supt. and he said the state depart of ed and state public health had a zoom meeting for supts. about return to learn this fall. He noted that EVERY person on the call from the state was working from home. Are they keeping in mind the people that can't work from home when they make these decisions? We both have our doubts.
Valid questions This guy has some good thoughts on the issue...

“I struggle to see how that group of leaders passed a 10th-grade science class,” he says. “They'll be running a giant experiment with children and adults, putting their lives at risk.”

“Schools are different than Walmarts. … It's not a 10-year-old in isolation. It's a 10-year-old with a 30-year-old teacher and a 50-year-old bus driver, who goes home to a 70-year-old grandmother. We have a high school with about 2,800 students and staff who have regular contact every day with another 100,000 people. … Not so simple. Can't just tap our heels like Dorothy in ‘The Wizard of Oz’ and get right back to school. Got to make sure it's safe. And until the virus in our community is at a lesser level, below World Health Organization guidelines, it's just not safe.”

https://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2020/07 ... os-angeles
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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

Post by UNI88 »

HI54UNI wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 5:44 am
UNI88 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:41 pm

Just having "on-line office hours" and distributing homework is what I meant by just giving out assignments. A teacher who does that is taking advantage of the situation and isn't really teaching. Depending on grade level and subject, I would expect teachers to hold live online classes (using Zoom or whatever technology the district provides) this should include in-class breakouts, outside of class virtual areas for group projects, and interactive quizzes (using Kahoot or similar). Online learning is repetitive and boring if all the students are doing is reading assignments and taking written tests/quizzes. There are a lot of tools that can help make online learning more fun and interactive that will help students learn and retain better. Districts should be helping teachers by providing platform access and training on these tools. Last semester was a shock and districts, schools and teachers were caught with their pants down. They've had the entire summer to get ready for this fall and don't have any excuses.
The return to school fight is starting to brew. The questions you posed earlier have some valid points but it is straight from the teacher's union. Parents are genuinely concerned about how they are going to keep their jobs, educate their kids, and manage childcare issues if their kids aren't in school. Some people are able to work from home but a lot cannot. The ones that cannot are really stressed. I don't get many phone calls from people but I'm starting to get them about going back to school. Our teachers are starting to make noise about not wanting to come back "for their health". We've told teachers they are coming back no matter what and they aren't happy. Even if the kids can't be in the classroom the teachers are going to be there to do their online instruction. No working from home. Pretty easy to social distance at work when every teacher has their own classroom. Also starting to hear members of the public complaining about paying taxes for full teacher salaries if the teachers aren't teaching. How do you defend that to a person that works at a grocery store or a nursing home and has a higher risk of exposure. Or a small business owner that has been shutdown for part of the year?

Yesterday I was talking to our school supt. and he said the state depart of ed and state public health had a zoom meeting for supts. about return to learn this fall. He noted that EVERY person on the call from the state was working from home. Are they keeping in mind the people that can't work from home when they make these decisions? We both have our doubts.
Fiver, thanks for your perspective! It definitely adds to my understanding. The questions I posted may be straight from the union but some of them are valid and should be answered before kids are brought back to school. Online education was and will be a huge drag on parents, especially those with younger kids and should be considered too. But the school districts job isn't to provide child care.

Having teachers come back and work from their classroom is a great approach. It will be harder for the lazy ones to hide behind technology and they will all have their hard copy resources and be able to collaborate with each other. I still think administrators should randomly audit what they're doing online. When I was subbing the principal/assistant principal would rotate through the school sitting in on in-person classes and district subject matter experts would do so as well. This shouldn't be any different.

Are you ready for the masks vs. my child isn't wearing a mask arguments? It's going to be like vaccinations to the power of 6.93.

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19

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American Association of Pediatrics recommends opening schools, citing children are very unlikely to spread diseases to anyone else.

Days later, they walk it back without a single medically-relevant fact other than people got upset by it.
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